Brett Kavanaugh Open Thread

What does everyone think?

These are my unedited thoughts (the sweet spot of BP is that we are read by enough people to make it lively but not enough to make us notorious).

(1.) I think there is no smoke without fire.

(2.) I also believe events may have exaggerated.

(3.) BK seems like a wannabe Alpha Male; doesn’t seem to be a nice chap at all either now or then.

(4.) Trump is a lot like Boris. A clownish public figure who has been relentless underestimated.

(5.) I do feel the BK nomination signals a darker turn in the Republic’s politics.

I do also think that men need to “guard themselves” the way women have done. Don’t drink irresponsibility, understand consent and frankly don’t “take liberties.”

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31 thoughts on “Brett Kavanaugh Open Thread”

  1. ‘I do also think that men need to “guard themselves” the way women have done. Don’t drink irresponsibility, understand consent and frankly don’t “take liberties.”

    Absolutely agree. Not sure if you are aware but a wave of #metoo exposés are bringing down a lot of celebreties in India right now. I don’t believe that the rules of engagement are vague/changing or any such excuse that is often made for men. Its trivial to get a sense of whats creepy and whats not. One genuine problem for men in my opinion is the unrealistic expectations of sexual licentiousness that they get from movies and TV shows. Many men seriously think such things happen and its just they who are missing out. They don’t think superheroes are real though just that every college/city/modern girl is desperate to sleep around if you harass them enough. This probably applies just to India however.

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    1. Personally speaking, if such an scenario were to occur in India, I’d believe the accuser 9 times out of 10, but then relative position of the sexes and the nature of sexual activity is very different between the US and India. In the US, there is almost zero stigma about extra-marital sexual relations, whether voluntary or coerced. Things are quite different in India (more similar to the US in the early 20th century, perhaps.)

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  2. I have to come down on the side of the judge here. The mainstream media and the Democrats seemed to jump to the conclusion that the guy was guilty on extremely flimsy evidence, and once it did that, everything he did seemed to dig the hole deeper as far as they were concerned. So, in spite of my opposition to the guy on judicial grounds, I’m satisfied at his confirmation because the opposite result would have implied that the Senate, at an institutional level, endorsed the allegations against him, and his career (and life) would have been toast.

    For the first time since 2016, I can understand at a gut level why so many Americans were willing to vote for Trump, a guy who I loathed then and now.

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    1. There are different standards of evidence between a criminal trial and a confirmation hearing. And Kavanaugh would, at worst, have returned home to his cushy lower-level court job barring a criminal conviction. Not being a SC justice =/= end of his career, except to an incredibly entitled crybaby.

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      1. Yes on different standards. But the nature of those standards matter too. I wouldn’t support a “believe every accuser every time” standard to deprive someone of a dog-catching position.

        No on Kavanaugh returning to his cushy lower-level judgeship. If the allegations are to be believed, he would (and should) be impeached from that job too, as many Democrats openly promised to do if they won the elections.

        We can discuss this in an open thread if you want, but the positions I have stated on this thread are consistent with my general position on judgments (criminal or otherwise), which I have believed for a long time should be biased in favor of the defendants. I’d oppose the death penalty on the grounds that even a single innocent person executed is one too many. “Innocent until proven guilty” is my watchword in all sorts of situations, and one which I have practiced in my life and career.

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  3. Please add this video to this article:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRJecfRxbr8

    I am a big supporter of #metoo!

    It is bringing back traditional values. Awesome!
    Any male falsely accused is guilty. If not of molestation, guilty of “stupidity”–which is almost as bad. They put their lives in the hands of an unreliable female with mood swings or questionable character. No male has the right to pass on their genes, have a “relationship”, or not be in jail. Falsely accused males have sacrifice themselves our species. And we thank them for this.

    How can anyone watch the “Judge” without laughing out of control for 15 minutes straight? I mean the laughing hurts.

    I have no idea about who is right and who isn’t. Not the slightest clue. And we don’t have to have an opinion on everything.

    “Numinous”, wasn’t it obvious why Trump was elected from the start for everyone who opposed Trump?

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    To everyone who opposes #metoo!, you are way too Europe, North America and Australiasia focused. #metoo! has transformed Mexico, Brazil, Central America, Latin America, North Africa, subsahharan Africa, East Asia, South East Asia, South Asia, Russia and the entire muslim world.

    A few false allegations are worth the price to free 800 muslim woman from 14 centuries of oppression. Make no mistake . . . females have been empowered across the length and breath of the muslim world. And not one moment too soon. Inshallah may female empowerment complete.

    And remember that many of the false allegations are not against males. For example, does anyone really believe that Jimmy Bennett isn’t falsely accusing Asia Argento of molesting him when he was seventeen?

    As Krishna says in 10.34 of the Gita . . . females rock! Females are number 1. Go girl power 🙂

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    “if such an scenario were to occur in India, I’d believe the accuser 9 times out of 1”
    Agreed. Except I would believe the female 99% of the time.

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    1. You misunderstood me. I understood perfectly well why people voted for Trump. Not just his positions on immigration and trade but also his unPC full frontal attacks on the opposition.

      I meant that I now feel this at a gut level myself. The past 2 weeks have inspired a mix of anger and contempt in me towards the left, the media, and the Democratic Party that I imagine the average Trump voter has been feeling all along.

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    2. What are your sources on Brazil? Because I’m here, and I’m not seeing that much change. (Maybe in some extremely middle-class – *not* the richer – areas, with which I’ve had somewhat less contact than I used to (but still a good deal) of late.)

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      1. Please elaborate Silva. Do you think #metoo! is mostly an elite Brazilian phenomenon?

        Are the large number of english language articles on #DeixaElaTrabalhar and #metoo! not representative? I can ask some of my Brazilian friends for clarification. Should I?

        Can you write an article about this important subject? I think that females around the world have been abused for far too long. And in most of the world false allegations are not a major problem.

        Look forward to learning from you.

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        1. I answer part of what you ask by translating an article I didn’t write. The source seems to be broken: http://revistaalfa.abril.com.br/entretenimento/cultura/tudo-junto-e-misturado/ . I bet all your friends are Brahmins as described below, and therefore you shouldn’t try to deduce anything about actual Brazilians (poor or rich, as per the article) from contact with them. (They might have either no interactions with “actual Brazilians”, or only in commercial contexts, in which the actual Brazilians behave in ways acceptable to Brahmins for the paycheck. Yes, this is more or less true even for the “poor-with-money” Brazilians.) Ask if you want any further information, and translation quality control is also appreciated.

          (I resent the spite towards Iranian cinema.)

          Everything together and mixed

          Traveling to the weird world of Brazilian social classes, our columnist found the Brahmins, who like slow Asian movies, hate Disney and loooooooooooove the poor

          If a social class spends the same way a class below would spend if it had the money, we aren’t talking about two different classes, but one. If this is true, then all we call social classes in Brazil, the lower, the middle, and the upper, are only one: poor people, with different amounts in the bank. The vast majority of Brazilians forms only one huge social class, that of people with more or less money; and this includes what’s conventionally called “the elites”. Thor Batista, for example, this guy with haircut and physique like a female death camp warden in Poland, seems to have consumption habits identical to those any poor person would have if they could pay for them. There aren’t significant cultural or spiritual differences between them.

          There’s also a second class, which I’ll call “Brahmins” and not “intelligentsia” because: 1) I’m not that silly; 2) that would give the impression they’re all intelligent. I mean the people who work with their minds, however unqualified. They’re journalists, cinema directors, teachers, opinion-filled musicians, writers, and other sorry creatures.

          The Brahmins, a few thousand in the entire country, have a serious class anxiety problem. They need to make clear they aren’t part of the other class – especially the more moneyed part, which they most despise and for which they most easily could be mistaken.

          Poor people without and with money make the difference between them in the simplest manner: showing money. On the other hand the way the Brahmins find to make clear this difference between themselves and class immediately below is to continuously shout they have contrary opinions to those of the bourgeois in everything. The poor with money despise the poor without money, and so the Brahmins love, loooooooooove – must love, you see, because that’s what distinguishes them – the moneyless. But love obssessively. They’d decorate their houses with poor people, if they could. Since they can’t, they buy Sebastião Salgado picture books and put them in the living room table. (It’s true that part of the so-called upper bourgeois does the same, but only the small part infected by the Brahmins via universities, newspapers, literary workshops, afternoon classes, and other such things.)

          They dress like poor people sometimes, and go to bars that overcharge to serve fake-poor food. Since the bourgeois like action movies, Brahmins may affect a taste for somewhat slower European and Asian movies. The bourgeois like Disney and so Brahmins criticize the “frightening concept of childhood”, the “plastic-wrapped artificiality” of the place (I took these phrases from a huge text by actress Fernanda Torres). Historically, the Brahmins sounded their first cuíca-sounding cry during the 1922 Modern Art Week, with Oswald wanting everyone to write like “a wise mulatto” and Mário shouting his class declaration: “I insult the bourgeois! The nickel-bourgeois, the bourgeois-bourgeois! The well-done digestion of São Paulo! The curve-man! The buttocks-man!”, so that nobody mistook him for a huge bourgeois.

          (“Buttocks-man” – how did Oswald de Andrade on hearing this? Is it only to me that he looks rather buttocky?)

          This way followed our Brahmins during 90 implacable years, from cocoa-cycle realism to urban realism, passing through Stalinist architecture, caracara-catch-kill-and-eat tropicalism, New Cinema, mangue beat, or whatever: always loving a little poor person, and making great effort to distinguish themselves from the poor buttocks-man who committed the heinous crime of being a class below theirs. And thus I explain the reason behind the “success” of Criolo, Walter Salles, Plínio Marcos, Portinari, Regina Casé, Marcelo Mirisola, cinema iraniano, Banksy, Pedro Almodóvar, Frida Kahlo etc., etc., etc.

          The short list of the things that really matter now

          BOOK
          The Island of Doctor Moreau – A cientist creates grotesque human-animal hybrids (there’s even a human St. Bernard). H. G. Wells’ novel is beautiful and monstruous, but if you get distressed thinking about experiments on animals, it may not be the best book (I suffered thinking about the puma’s cries while being operated on). Good translation and preface by Bráulio Tavares.

          MUSIC
          The Wall – Immersion is a box with 6 CDs and a DVD that has demos, rehearsal parts, and a show of the conceptual album that would become Pink Floyd’s masterpiece and cause of destruction. It’s clear through the song sketches that all ideas were from dictator bassist Roger Waters. But, as with Comfortably Numb, they’d never get off the floor without the other three band members’ contribution – especially guitarist and singer David Gilmour.

          SERIES
          Homeland – With Claire Danes, Mandy Patinkin, and, yes, “Brazilian Morena Baccarin” (everybody says that, but in real life she barely speaks Portuguese, let’s calm down). Claire, a CIA agent, suspects a marine war hero is an Al-Qaeda double agent. The year’s best series, probably – even with the return of Game of Thrones and Mad Men. On FX.

          SITES
          Movimento Seinfeld
          By various Brazilian authors, catoonists, bloggers, and comedians (some very good, other not quite), who write about the Seinfeld series, episode by episode. The truth is that if you like a series and watched and rewatched all episodes, reading about it is all that’s left – and this is a good place to spend 15 minutes.

          E Deus Criou a Mulher [“And God Created Woman”]
          Portugues collective blog, only about pictures of beautiful women, without pornographic images, only nudes in good taste, all really beautiful. Besides, the blog’s authors cultivate a healthy crush for English model Daisy Lowe.

          The War Nerd Column
          Bimonthly on the The Exile online magazine, written by Gary Brecher (whose real name is John Dolan), an American professor and poet. He talks about past and present wars so well, with so much style and humor – and rage at times -, that even I, who am not really that interested in war, always read what he writes to the end. It’s good to the point of wanting to print and bind.

          Tags: Banksy, Brahmins, Iranian cinema, Criolo, Frida Kahlo, J. P. Cuenca, Marcelo Mirisola, Pedro Almodóvar, Plínio Marcos, Portinari, Regina Casé, Walter Salles

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        2. Translated an article (from a broken source), tried to post, it vanished. Trying again. The idea being: you shouldn’t try to deduce anything about actual Brazilians from contact with your friends – I assume they’re all Brahmins as per the article, and their interactions with actual Brazilians are all commercial, in which they act acceptably to Brahmins for the paycheck.

          Everything together and mixed

          Traveling to the weird world of Brazilian social classes, our columnist found the Brahmins, who like slow Asian movies, hate Disney and loooooooooooove the poor

          If a social class spends the same way a class below would spend if it had the money, we aren’t talking about two different classes, but one. If this is true, then all we call social classes in Brazil, the lower, the middle, and the upper, are only one: poor people, with different amounts in the bank. The vast majority of Brazilians forms only one huge social class, that of people with more or less money; and this includes what’s conventionally called “the elites”. Thor Batista, for example, this guy with haircut and physique like a female death camp warden in Poland, seems to have consumption habits identical to those any poor person would have if they could pay for them. There aren’t significant cultural or spiritual differences between them.

          There’s also a second class, which I’ll call “Brahmins” and not intelligentsia because: 1) I’m not that silly; 2) that would give the impression they’re all intelligent. I mean the people who work with their minds, however unqualified. They’re journalists, cinema directors, teachers, opinion-filled musicians, writers, and other sorry creatures.

          The Brahmins, a few thousand in the entire country, have a serious class anxiety problem. They need to make clear they aren’t part of the other class – especially the more moneyed part, which they most despise and for which they most easily could be mistaken.

          Poor people without and with money make the difference between them in the simplest manner: showing money. On the other hand the way the Brahmins find to make clear this difference between themselves and class immediately below is to continuously shout they have contrary opinions to those of the bourgeois in everything. The poor with money despise the poor without money, and so the Brahmins love, loooooooooove – must love, you see, because that’s what distinguishes them – the moneyless. But love obssessively. They’d decorate their houses with poor people, if they could. Since they can’t, they buy Sebastião Salgado picture books and put them in the living room table. (It’s true that part of the so-called upper bourgeois does the same, but only the small part infected by the Brahmins via universities, newspapers, literary workshops, afternoon classes, and other such things.)

          They dress like poor sometimes, and go to bars that overcharge to serve fake-poor food. Since the bourgeois like action movies, Brahmins may affect a taste for somewhat slower European and Asian movies. The bourgeois like Disney and so Brahmins criticize the “frightening concept of childhood”, the “plastic-wrapped artificiality” of the place (I took these phrases from a huge text by actress Fernanda Torres). Historically, the Brahmins sounded their first cuíca-sounding cry during the 1922 Modern Art Week, with Oswald wanting everyone to write like “a wise mulatto” and Mário shouting his class declaration: “I insult the bourgeois! The nickel-bourgeois, the bourgeois-bourgeois! The well-done digestion of São Paulo! The curve-man! The buttocks-man!”, so that nobody mistook him for a huge bourgeois.

          (“Buttocks-man” – how did Oswald de Andrade on hearing this? Is it only to me that he looks rather buttocky?)

          This way followed our Brahmins during 90 implacable years, from cocoa-cycle realism to urban realism, passing through Stalinist architecture, caracara-catch-kill-and-eat tropicalism, New Cinema, mangue beat, or whatever: always loving a little poor person, and making great effort to distinguish themselves from the poor buttocks-man who committed the heinous crime of being a class below theirs. And thus I explain the reason behind the “success” of Criolo, Walter Salles, Plínio Marcos, Portinari, Regina Casé, Marcelo Mirisola, cinema iraniano, Banksy, Pedro Almodóvar, Frida Kahlo etc., etc., etc.

          The short list of the things that really matter now

          BOOK
          The Island of Doctor Moreau – A cientist creates grotesque human-animal hybrids (there’s even a human St. Bernard). H. G. Wells’ novel is beautiful and monstruous, but if you get distressed thinking about experiments on animals, it may not be the best book (I suffered thinking about the puma’s cries while being operated on). Good translation and preface by Bráulio Tavares.

          MUSIC
          The Wall – Immersion is a box with 6 CDs and a DVD that has demos, rehearsal parts, and a show of the conceptual album that would become Pink Floyd’s masterpiece and cause of destruction. It’s clear through the song sketches that all ideas were from dictator bassist Roger Waters. But, as with Comfortably Numb, they’d never get off the floor without the other three band members’ contribution – especially guitarist and singer David Gilmour.

          SERIES
          Homeland – With Claire Danes, Mandy Patinkin, and, yes, “Brazilian Morena Baccarin” (everybody says that, but in real life she barely speaks Portuguese, let’s calm down). Claire, a CIA agent, suspects a marine war hero is an Al-Qaeda double agent. The year’s best series, probably – even with the return of Game of Thrones and Mad Men. On FX.

          SITES
          Movimento Seinfeld
          By various Brazilian authors, catoonists, bloggers, and comedians (some very good, other not quite), who write about the Seinfeld series, episode by episode. The truth is that if you like a series and watched and rewatched all episodes, reading about it is all that’s left – and this is a good place to spend 15 minutes.

          E Deus Criou a Mulher [“And God Created Woman”]
          Portugues collective blog, only about pictures of beautiful women, without pornographic images, only nudes in good taste, all really beautiful. Besides, the blog’s authors cultivate a healthy crush for English model Daisy Lowe.

          The War Nerd Column
          Bimonthly on the The Exile online magazine, written by Gary Brecher (whose real name is John Dolan), an American professor and poet. He talks about past and present wars so well, with so much style and humor – and rage at times -, that even I, who am not really that interested in war, always read what he writes to the end. It’s good to the point of wanting to print and bind.

          Tags: Banksy, Brahmins, Iranian cinema, Criolo, Frida Kahlo, J. P. Cuenca, Marcelo Mirisola, Pedro Almodóvar, Plínio Marcos, Portinari, Regina Casé, Walter Salles

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  4. Most leftists, democrats and independents around the world understand perfectly well why people voted for Trump. As did you.

    Most leftists can’t stand politically correct self righteous condescending pretentious patronizing post modernists.

    Too bad the vehicle opposing them couldn’t be a little bit better.

    Sigh. 🙁

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  5. It is deeply troubling that an alleged sexual assaulter would be confirmed as a Supreme Court Justice. But then the president who nominated him was accused of sexual assault himself.

    Trump made fun of Dr. Ford at a rally and people laughed and cheered. That is also deeply troubling.

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    1. We all know Trump is a d***, but his behavior ought not to be projected onto his nominees, who should be judged on their own records.

      It is deeply troubling that an alleged sexual assaulter would be confirmed as a Supreme Court Justice.

      True. But such an allegation must meet a certain plausibility bar, no? In this case, no evidence has emerged to even substantiate the existence of the crime scene, let alone the crime. Unless we assume that everyone else involved and who could have come forward is either dead or suffers from amnesia.

      Can you answer the question of how you would distinguish a truly false allegation from one that had no corroborating details (like in the case at hand)?

      I’m referring only to the main allegation. The second allegation seems to have been an “it may have been Kavanaugh” case (reasoned after many days of thinking), while the allegations about the gang rapes are ludicrous IMHO (and the accuser ought to be sued for defamation unless she can prove her case.)

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      1. I would tend to believe Dr. Ford. Why would she subject herself and her family to this process if she was making things up? In general I think we are supposed to believe the survivors. Kavanaugh basically just yelled and said it was all a Clinton conspiracy.

        In any case, I think the allegations are serious enough that he shouldn’t be confirmed, even if there is no way of definitively proving them.

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        1. I don’t think there’s any point in rehashing what so many other people on the web have already said, so I’ll just I’ll repeat my earlier question: how would you distinguish a truly false accusation from one that is true but highly sketchy? I can honestly answer that I cannot. Therefore, I conclude that the bar to make a false (or mistaken) accusation has fallen very low. That disturbs me to no end. I don’t want a world where people are judged based on their backgrounds rather than the facts of an individual case. Do you?

          People keep brandishing statistics about how few accusations turn out to be false statistically. What I’ve read is that, (i) those statistics are a bit misleading, because the conviction probability tends to be substantially lower than the rate of getting a case heard in court, and (ii) if the new standard is to believe every accuser, the false accusation rate has to rise significantly higher in the future.

          Why would she subject herself and her family to this process if she was making things up?

          She could be saying the truth, OR she could be lying, OR she could be mistaken about Kavanaugh’s culpability while fervently believing it. I have no idea what the correct answer is, but given the evidence (or lack of it) in front of us, I see no reason to give a higher weight to the “she must be speaking the truth” answer. What I do not want to do is ascribe guilt or innocence on the basis of my political priors (as I mentioned above, I’d oppose Kavanaugh on judicial philosophy grounds, because, well, I’m a liberal.)

          In any case, I think the allegations are serious enough that he shouldn’t be confirmed, even if there is no way of definitively proving them.

          I’ll state again that you underestimate the ease of filing serious allegations that have no chance of being proven, especially if accusers know that they are likely to be believed than not. If we accept your standard, it will wreck the system of law-and-order and make judgments and punishments wholly political in nature.

          (I think I’ve said all I had to say. But thanks for engaging with me.)

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          1. The whole point of #Metoo is that far more women have experienced sexual harassment (on a continuum from unwanted advances to rape) than was previously thought.

            It is true that there may be some false allegations, but generally I believe we should err on the side of believing the survivor, unless there are serious doubts about their credibility.

            As Fraxinicus points out above, Kavanaugh was not going to be charged with a crime. He simply would not have been put on the Supreme Court. A lifetime appointment to the highest court in the land should not be given to an alleged sexual abuser. The partisan voting has tainted the Senate and the SC.

            1+
          2. Kabir,

            As I responded to Fraxinicus, it’s not just about denying this guy a Supreme Court seat. If that were the end of if it, I’d agree that he ought to have been voted down. Everyone opposed to his nomination at this time doesn’t just believe he is unqualified to sit on the bench, but that he is (or at least was) a lying, drunken, sex predator. There has been relentless press coverage to that effect. A negative vote would have endorsed that position, and a logical follow-up would be to impeach him off his current position as well, destroying his life and career completely. (And why not if he is as bad as he has been portrayed!) His name would be mud for the foreseeable future. I don’t think trying to thwart that outcome makes him a whiny entitled brat.

            I don’t know what else to say at this point. One has to have a modicum of empathy with this guy to appreciate the predicament he (and his sponsors in the Republican Party) were in.

            As for believing accusers, I agree up to a point. But you’ll have to articulate a standard for judging the accused. Is mere allegation enough to put someone in jail, or even deprive them of a job (many companies are actually doing this; if someone is accused internally of sexual harassment, unless the accused is deemed really valuable, he/she might be toast.) In the Ford case, I’d argue she has been given utmost respect throughout the process, even getting a hearing in front of the US Senate. Her provided testimony and supporting evidence was ultimately found wanting, which is one of the results you’ll have to expect from processes like these.

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          3. I would save my empathy for the survivors of the alleged sex abuse and not for the alleged perpetrator.

            I don’t think allegations should necessarily cost people their jobs. But all allegations should be credibly investigated. And I don’t believe that the president could not have found another nominee who was not tainted by such allegations.

            On a related note, #MeToo is really blowing up in India, with a lot of cases coming out in the media industry and in Bollywood.

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          4. You are expecting a logical, coherent, universal answer from a person like Kabir? You can teach a cat to fetch your newspaper before you can get a logical, coherent, universal answer from a artsy, fartsy, feelingy person.

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  6. “On a related note, #MeToo is really blowing up in India, with a lot of cases coming out in the media industry and in Bollywood.”
    Agree completely. #MeToo is much bigger outside North America than inside North America.

    “I would save my empathy for the survivors of the alleged sex abuse and not for the alleged perpetrator.”

    Is that because you see “the alleged perpetrator” as guilty of at least stupidity the way I do?

    How do you think Asia Argento should be punished for allowing Jimmy Bennet to most probably falsely accuse her of molesting him when he was seventeen?

    How do you think false accusers should be punished?

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    1. I save my empathy for the survivors because, even in this day and age, it takes a lot to come forward and admit that you were abused. There is still too much of a sense that “boys will be boys”. Ideas about consent are changing and I’m glad for it.

      I have no specific ideas about how false accusations should be punished, but I gather that their number is minimal. All allegations should be credibly investigated.

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          1. Thanks for the link. After reading it, I came upon a related article. This paragraph was interesting:
            “Like Hockenberry, Ghomeshi insists that he is in favor of cultural progress, then mischaracterizes the direction of that progress in order to disown it. He is “not planning to seek public absolution through the embrace of a notion that all men are evil,” he writes. But he has “had a crash course in empathy,” which has given him “a new unwavering antipathy toward schadenfreude” and “a different way of seeing anyone who is being attacked in the public sphere, even those with whom I may profoundly disagree.” In other words, Ghomeshi has been developing empathy primarily for the accused. He and Hockenberry, and the otherwise left-leaning magazines that published them, are helping to establish a liberal men’s-rights discourse in which all the old and terrible structures of male supremacy are rebuilt, coated with a veneer of independent thinking, and fronted by a tactical insistence that everyone involved has the utmost respect for women, is absolutely on the side of equality, and is just asking the complicated questions that must be asked.”

            All this discussion about having “empathy” for Judge Kavanaugh is not ideologically neutral. As mentioned in the linked piece, the worst consequence he would have faced would have been to not be confirmed to the SC. That he was confirmed despite the allegations against him says something about today’s Republican Party.

            https://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/jian-ghomeshi-john-hockenberry-and-the-laws-of-patriarchal-physics

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          2. @Saurav

            “Now the move to their “Ansari”-fication”

            Good for Aziz! Give “Wokeness” it’s comeuppance! Would love to see that translated into his Netflix series (pull a Dave Chapelle and just go crazy with it!).

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          3. Oh i am loving it, the ansari thing i would say was a damp squib, it was a perfect example of deciding the contours of the metoo movement. But rather than seizing it, he was quickly thrown under the bus. Now i am watching how this Indian metoo revolution will devour itself. Already you are finding pushback from many liberal women who are doing exactly what they have accused the boy band of doing-protecting their woke male friends(lest it delegitimizes the whole liberal movement) from the right wing onslaught. Now nuance is being argued by our woke women. The few right wingers whose named propped up are now buried under the devulge of woke men. You already have criticism now that metoo is upper caste women thing by dalit women. Kashmiri journalist have been accused and they do what they do best , accusing their accusers as RSS/Indian agents, even though its laughable as the very same (hindu)women are half-azaadi wala anyways. Full Masala movie

            This is the best thing to happen in a long time. LOL

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