The last hours of the Romanovs

…..a heap of charred
bones was discovered in a mine shaft….. Amongst trinkets and buckles he recognized articles
belonging to the Empress, her four daughters and the Tsarevitch…The bodies had been burnt, dowsed in sulphuric acid and dumped….they found a finger. “We do not know whose finger it was. I
think it must belong to the Empress”….

Newly declassified files (after 100 years!!!) tell us what happened to the Romanovs (see below). The last hours are pure horror. This was also the case for Mujibur Rahman in Bangladesh, Nicolae Ceausescu in Romania, and Muammar Gadhaffi in Libya. This is why the Assads and the Saddams fight so hard, it is kill or be killed (after they have poked a stick up your anus).

Romanovs (Russia, July 1918): The treatment of the royal family, now held captive at Ipatiev House
in Ekaterinburg, became increasingly harsh. Colonel Pavel Rodzianko says
he believed the royal women were sexually abused by their guards. “I
saw in the room in which the murder took place obscene drawings with
inscriptions, partly obliterated since, but clear enough to read. There
were horrible pictures of Rasputin and the Empress and inscriptions
boasting of outrage, and the shrieks that were heard at night tend to
confirm this. Anything more horrible than the last week of the family
cannot be imagined.”

Mujibur Rahman (Bangladesh, August 1975, ref. Wiki): In the early morning of August 15, 1975,  members of the Bengal Lancers of the First Armoured Division and 535 Infantry Division under Major Huda, attacked Mujibur’s residence. Mujibur
was shot and killed on the stairs.


………
Dr Wajed Myan’s account* on the murder
of Sheikh Russell shows that the artillery officers were personally
involved in the massacre: 

“..Russell ran down to take
shelter among the people put already in line at gun point for execution.
Abdur Rahman Roma, who looked after Russell for years, was holding his
hand. A little later one of the soldiers took Russell from Roma to send
him out of the house. 

Russell, frightened to death, burst into tears and
begged for life: “For God’s sake please don’t kill me. I’ll be forever
your servant if  you let me live.
My Hasu apa (sister Sheikh Haisna) and
brother-in-law live in Germany. I beg you, please send me to Hasu apa
and my brother-in-law in Germany.” Moved by Russell’s tears, the said
soldier hid Russell in the sentry box at the main gate of the house.
Half an hour later, a major seeing Russell hiding there, took him
upstairs and killed Russell in cold blood by shooting on his head with
his revolver.” 

………..


Three months later, four major founding leaders of the Awami League, first Prime Minister of Bangladesh Tajuddin Ahmed, former Prime Minister Mansur Ali, former Vice President Syed Nazrul Islam and former Home Minister A H M Kamruzzaman were arrested and brutally murdered in Dhaka jail on November 3, 1975.

Ceaucescu (Romania, December 1989): On Christmas Day, 25 December, in a small room the Ceaușescus were tried
before a drumhead court-martial convened on orders of the National
Salvation Front, Romania’s provisional government. They faced charges
including illegal gathering of wealth and genocide.
Ceaușescu repeatedly denied the court’s authority to try him, and
asserted he was still legally president of Romania. At the end of the
quick show trial the Ceaușescus were found guilty and sentenced to
death.



A soldier standing guard in the proceedings was ordered to take
the Ceaușescus out back one by one and shoot them, but the Ceaușescus
demanded to die together. The soldiers agreed to this and began to tie
their hands behind their back which the Ceaușescus protested against but
were powerless to prevent.




The Ceaușescus were executed by a gathering of soldiers: Captain
Ionel Boeru, Sergeant-Major Georghin Octavian and Dorin-Marian Cîrlan,
while reportedly hundreds of others also volunteered. The firing squad
began shooting as soon as the two were in position against a wall. 

A TV
crew who were to film the execution only managed to catch the end of it
as the Ceaușescus lay on the ground shrouded by dust kicked up by the
bullets striking the wall and ground. Before his sentence was carried
out, Nicolae Ceaușescu sang “The Internationale” while being led up against the wall. After the shooting, the bodies were covered with canvas.

Gadhaffi (Libya, October 2011, ref. Wiki): On 20 October, Gaddafi broke out of Sirte’s District 2 in a joint
civilian-military convoy, hoping to take refuge in the Jarref Valley. At around 8.30am, NATO bombers attacked, destroying at least 14 vehicles and killing at least 53.
The convoy scattered, and Gaddafi and those closest to him fled to a
nearby villa, which was shelled by rebel militia from Misrata. 

Fleeing
to a construction site, Gaddafi and his inner consort hid inside
drainage pipes while his bodyguards battled the rebels; in the conflict,
Gaddafi suffered head injuries from a grenade blast while defence
minister Abu-Bakr Yunis Jabr was killed. 

A Misratan militia took Gaddafi prisoner, beating him and stabbing him
in the anus, causing serious injuries; the events were filmed on a
mobile phone. Pulled onto the front of a pick-up truck, he fell off as
it drove away. His semi-naked, lifeless body was then placed into an
ambulance and taken to Misrata; upon arrival, he was found to be dead. 

Gaddafi’s son Mutassim,
who had also been among the convoy, was also captured, and found dead
several hours later, most probably from an extrajudicial execution.
Around 140 Gaddafi loyalists were rounded up from the convoy; tied up
and abused, the corpses of 66 were found at the nearby Mahari Hotel,
victims of extrajudicial execution.

………….

And 75 years later, documents which have been locked inside the most
secret archives of the British state are chilling in their account of
the murders: “She kept running about and hid herself behind a pillow, on
her body were 32 wounds. The Grand Duchess Anastasia Nicholaevna fell
down in a faint. When they began to examine her she began to scream
wildly and they dispatched her with bayonets and butt ends of their
rifles.”



The assassination of Tsar Nicholas II and his family horrified the
then British King, George V, and the fate of his close Russian relatives
has been the subject of mystery and speculation ever since.



The newly declassified files, compiled at great personal risk by
British diplomats and secret agents, were handed over yesterday by the
Foreign Secretary, Robin Cook, to his Russian counterpart, Igor Ivanov,
at a ceremony at the Foreign Office. They contained hundreds of
documents from the British archives on the death of the last Tsar and
his family at the hands of the Bolsheviks. The exchange of documents
came as Mr Cook and Mr Ivanov signed a memorandum of co-operation
between the archives of the two foreign ministries. In return Mr Ivanov
handed over original documents captured by Soviet forces from the
Germans at the end of the Second World War. They relate largely to the
fate of British prisoners of war held by the Germans.



According to a Foreign Office spokesman many of the British files on
the murder of the Romanov family were classified as “top secret” until
this release. They contain voluminous encrypted correspondence between
the Foreign Office and its representatives in the field from 1918 to
1920. Some are hand-written letters between King George, Nicholas’s
cousin, and the then foreign secretary, AJ Balfour.



The Russian royal family was related to many of Europe’s dynasties,
and the Bolshevik revolution sent a chill wind through the rest of
Europe. The files show how much the murder of the Tsar and his family
shook the British state and confirmed the worst fears of the brutal
nature of the Russian revolution.



The 38 bulky files now released to the Russians have taken British
archivists several years to compile. They begin with a despatch from the
British Consul in Ekaterinburg on 18 May 1918, noting the arrival of
the Tsar and other members of the Russian royal family under a Red Army
guard. The next, a terse telegram from Moscow, delivers stark news.
“Ex-Emperor of Russia, Nicholas: Reports that he was shot on July 16 by
order of Ekaterinburg Local Soviet.” The memo is marked for the
attention of the king.



Then begins a flurry of requests and reports across half the world to
establish the truth of the allegations. Rumour and deceit are mixed
together in the reports, along with vividly accurate accounts piecing
together the grisly events of 16 and 17 July 1918. All this was done in
the fog of war in which the British military actively intervened on the
side of the pro-royalist “White Russians”.



Victories by the pro-royalist army in the Ekaterinburg area in the
weeks after the murders meant the assassinations could be investigated.
The British kept themselves closely informed. An intelligence report
dated 1 September 1918 from the British headquarters at Archangel to the
Director of Military Intelligence in London reports: “Last night I
received following information from an officer eye-witness whom I have
no reason to doubt. After the Czechs took Ekaterinburg enquiries were
made as to the whereabouts of the Imperial Family but these were without
result. Then on the second day after the occupation a heap of charred
bones was discovered in a mine shaft, about 30 versts north of the town.
Among the ashes were shoe buckles, corset ribs diamonds and platinum
crosses … Amongst trinkets and buckles he recognised articles
belonging to the Empress, her four daughters and the Tsarevitch.” At the
top of the report a note says a summary had been sent to King George V
“omitting gruesome details”.



The bodies had been burnt,dowsed in sulphuric acid and dumped. Among
the remains they found a finger. “We do not know whose finger it was. I
think it must belong to the Empress,” reported one eye-witness. “It is
very difficult to tell because it is so very swollen. They probably
wanted to take off the ring, and as the fingers were so swollen and they
could not get it off, they cut off the finger. It was lying there in
the ashes as were the false teeth.”



When the King did learn of the full gruesome details in July 1919 his
aide, Lord Stamfordham, wrote to the Foreign Office, describing the
King’s horror and conveying the King’s desire that such details should
be kept from the press.



From these contemporary documents the nightmare of the last days of
the Tsar emerge. Sydney Gibbs, the former tutor to the Tsarevitch, was
with the royal family nearly to the end. His detailed account to Sir
Charles Eliot, High Commissioner in Siberia – the Foreign Office’s main
investigator in the area – appears in the newly released documents.



He recorded their journey to Ekaterinburg in the hands of the Soviet
secret police. “The carriages were strewn with hay on which they sat, or
rather reclined. The roads were in a fearful condition, the thaws
having already begun, and at one point they were obliged to cross the
river on foot, the ice being already unsafe.”



The treatment of the royal family, now held captive at Ipatiev House
in Ekaterinburg, became increasingly harsh. Colonel Pavel Rodzianko says
he believed the royal women were sexually abused by their guards. “I
saw in the room in which the murder took place obscene drawings with
inscriptions, partly obliterated since, but clear enough to read. There
were horrible pictures of Rasputin and the Empress and inscriptions
boasting of outrage, and the shrieks that were heard at night tend to
confirm this. Anything more horrible than the last week of the family
cannot be imagined.”



Speculation about the fate of the Russian royal family only ended in
1991, when bones discovered near Ekaterinburg were proved to be those of
the Tsar and all the members of the family known to be with him at the
time. Just a year ago the Tsar was finally reburied in a ceremony in St
Petersburg.



THOSE WHO died at Ekaterinburg were Tsar Nicholas II; the Tsarina,
Alexandra Feodorovna, born Princess Alix of Hesse; Alexei, the
Tsarevitch; and four other children, Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Anastasia.



The most legendary claimant to being a survivor was a woman who
appeared in 1920 saying she was Anastasia, the youngest of the
daughters.



The Romanov dynasty was linked by blood with many European royal families, including those of Britain and Germany.


In 1871 Emperor Alexander had bled to death after a terrorist bomb
was thrown at him in St Petersburg. His son, Alexander III, unleashed a
wave of repression. He died of liver disease, aged 49, in 1894, and was
succeeded by his son, Nicholas.



In 1909 the Tsar travelled to England and saw his cousin and friend,
the Prince of Wales, the future George V (above). The Romanovs arrived
in style aboard the imperial yacht to attend Regatta Week at Cowes.



On his return the political situation worsened. The Russian army was
defeated in the First World War. Revolution broke out in 1917, and a
civil war lasted until 1920.

………………………..

Link (1): http://www.independent.co.uk/news/secret-files-tell-of-final-terrors-for-romanovs-1108026.html

* Link (2): http://www.muktadhara.net/mujibassassination.htm
……..

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