Brown power now!

The brain and the brawn!

A comment below set me off because it’s so dumb. In the 1980s brown Americans were so marginal that my parents were excited when they saw a little Indian boy in a cereal commercial.

What can brown do for you?

Today the man behind the skirt is <<<Saikat Chakrabarti>>>, a Communistic fellow of bhadralok, Wall Street, and Silicon Valley pedigree who is driving the Democratic party to the Left through one set of bicep curls at a time. Bernie Sanders’ campaign is run by one Faiz Shakir, a Pakistan American. One of the four co-chairs is Ro Khanna. Meanwhile, a woman whose mother is an Iyer is now second in the polls in New Hampshire. A woman named Neer Tanden is President of Center for American Progress, the node of establishment liberal political activism. Another woman named Pramila Jayapal is co-chair of the House Progressive Caucasus.

Who is kidding who here? Browns are now elite paratroopers on the Left. The special forces wielding language in the open and money behind the scenes. They’re using the master’s tools to tear down the master’s house. I hope they fail, but their power is what it is. Don’t be a dumbass. There’s a brown fist coming at us. We best be ready.

44 Replies to “Brown power now!”

  1. So both of the following statements are true:

    1) Asian Americans (incl. brownz) are massively over-represented in colleges.

    2) Asian Americans (incl. brownz) are discriminated on the basis of their race due to affirmative action policies in the college admissions process.

    Over-representation in this case doesn’t necessarily mean a lack of a racial handicap in the admissions process.

    My view is that South Asian Americans are simply over-achieving due to being descended from a highly-selected group of over-achievers from the sub-continent.

    This allows them to be successful in-spite of the cultural marginalization or affirmative action challenges that they face in America.

    I also agree that the cultural marginalization is improving as South Asian Americans are starting to be seen more as real Americans rather than as foreigners. However there is still a long way to go.

    PS. I hold these views genuinely but lightly.

    PPS I am pretty dumb on most topics but trying to get smarter so don’t be too offended.

    1. “My view is that South Asian Americans are simply over-achieving due to being descended from a highly-selected group of over-achievers from the sub-continent.”
      Not saying this isn’t true (it is), but why does this reasoning never seem to apply to East Asian Americans in this sphere of the internet? Most Chinese Americans today are descended from highly skilled emigrants the same as Indo-Pak-Americans, and most (if not all) Chinese foreign national students come from wealthy families. As far as I’m aware, Japanese and Korean Americans are not as overrepresented in elite schools as Chinese(-Americans) are. Why is it that when South Asians overperform it’s seen as some sort of statistical fluke, but when East Asians overperform it’s something to be expected?

      1. As far as I’m aware, Japanese and Korean Americans are not as overrepresented in elite schools as Chinese(-Americans) are. Why is it that when South Asians overperform it’s seen as some sort of statistical fluke, but when East Asians overperform it’s something to be expected?

        japanese are weird cuz they are highly assimilated. but koreans really are overrepresented. something like 10% of stuyvestant and MIT is korean.

        and east asian societies are more advanced than south asian societies, that’s why.

        the ‘model minority’ idea emerged in the 1960s to describe descendants of japanese farmers and cantonese laborers. these were not people who were strongly skill selected, but their descendents were doing OK (in fact, the japanese who left tended to be landless).

        1. “something like 10% of stuyvestant and MIT is korean.”

          Didn’t know that. However, Korean immigration to the United States remains fairly high compared to, say, Japanese immigration, and considering that South Korea is more developed and wealthier per capita than China. I would imagine some selection bias remains in place here as well, however.

          “and east asian societies are more advanced than south asian societies, that’s why.”

          Never claimed otherwise. But China (and Mongolia, which is technically part of East Asia) remain underdeveloped relative to the other members of the region (North Korea completely left out of the equation). But is that because South Asians are *inherently less capable* of creating advanced societies as the Sailer brigade would have us believe, or is it because South Asians have greater barriers to overcome than East Asians (direct colonization, caste issues, democracy vs, authoritarianism, etc.)?

          “The ‘model minority’ idea emerged in the 1960s to describe descendants of japanese farmers and cantonese laborers. these were not people who were strongly skill selected, but their descendents were doing OK.”

          I’m aware that the earliest Chinese and Japanese Americans were not coming from the highest strata of their respective societies. Yes, they did rather well for themselves, but they weren’t as successful as Asian Americans today are. They were, from what I’ve read, either slightly below average or on par with white Americans socioeconomically speaking.

          1. They were, from what I’ve read, either slightly below average or on par with white Americans socioeconomically speaking.

            what does that mean? i just spent 10 minutes checking. here is the long story re: 1930-1970 data sets

            1) clear wage penalty for being asian
            2) pretty much caught up income-wise, but not if you control for education
            3) they had gotten ahead of whites (jap, chinese) or matched (filipino) in education, though probably only way to counter discrimination

            two caveats
            – huge generation effects. e.g., chinese first-gen pretty poor and uneducated, so huge shifts 1950 and later

            – seems like some of the japanese were actually more educated, at least those who went to the mainland (contrast with the large hawaii japanese group)

            i think you are confused because the wage premium for university educations for asian americans was really really shitty in the mid-20th-century due to discrimination.

          2. I would imagine some selection bias remains in place here as well, however.

            i haven’t looked up the details, but a lot of korean immigrants work in small-businesses cuz they have shitty english skills. though a lot of them were more educated in korea.

            that being said, selection bias for high SES tends to be stronger in poor countries. there is a reason professionals from india and nigeria wanted to come to the USA. the brain drain from india is lower now for sure. i know of many people (young) who are excited to go back to india with their degrees.

            the same is happening with china. after 1965 lots of educated taiwanese and chinese arrived. now a lot of chinese are excited to go back, including academics who had settled here in the states.

          3. A Chinese American engineer of my acquaintance tells of the envy she would attract whenever she visited China upto about the nineties. Now, she says, she feels like a poor relation among the peers she went to school with (and left behind). The envy has been replaced with something like condescension.

        2. Not surprised that brain drain from India is decreasing. Quite pleased, in fact. Are similar things taking place among Bangladeshis and Sri Lankans for example? I would imagine Pakistan wouldn’t be seeing a similar situation, nor Nepal.

          Are Bangladeshis as highly self-selected for higher SES as Indians and Pakistanis are? It seems that most Bangladeshi-Americans are blue-collar workers and have high poverty rates relative to the American average, but their children seem to be upwardly mobile.

          1. Are Bangladeshis as highly self-selected for higher SES as Indians and Pakistanis are? It seems that most Bangladeshi-Americans are blue-collar workers and have high poverty rates relative to the American average, but their children seem to be upwardly mobile.

            shafiq knows better than me, but his impression is that ppl aren’t going back to bangladesh. the reason is that bangaldesh economic browth is ‘bottom-up’ manufacturing, not through high-tech professionals (unlike india).

            bangladeshis are poorer last i checked. i think part of it is that the massive wave of migrations dates to far later than indians and even pakistanis (1990s and later).

            bangladeshi students are a big presence at stuyvestant.

  2. lol you act like this guy is some sort of Steve Reeves. He looks like a regular guy who trains. Go on a big state school campus. Around 40% of S Asian guys look around this with a good majority of those being even bigger. 20% still starving looking. 30% Skinny fat. 10% downright obese
    women are definitely in the deathly skinny and obese camps much more

  3. I find very paradojic and funny the fact that the wealthiest younger (and not so young) generation who born in golden cradles full of pretty stuff worthy of social media signaling, are the new proletarians trying to begin the radical wealth distribution of the era.

    This side of the border is full of people like them. At the end of the day, they are the typical petit burgueoise trying to win a place in the world, and maybe some of them will make it.

    I don’t know in the USA, but at least here in Mexico, those people never gain the people’s respect, the few ones who achieve a political position are the exception.

    The political taste of the masses here in Mexico, are the grassroots politicians, with humble beginning. A clear example is the current president (or at least, that is his official discourse).

    But, who knows, maybe we are in the proverbial generation gap struggle, and these fashionable wealthy socialists will be our next rulers, we like it or not.

    1. Also mexican.

      Well, they are usually frustrated middle class types that struggle to beat the hegemony of the rich kids. They are full of piss n vinegar.

      But as you say those rarely manage to gain appeal as they are usually progressive nerds and would go down ASAP in a fist fight with a real marxist or conservative.

      MORENA won by stealing PRI’s talent pool and some good propaganda. They are gonna stick to “Elizabeth Warren” types.

      Chakrabarti kinda has a Mexican counterpart in the USA. I wonder if he sent money to López Obrador.

      1. Who is the Mexican Chakrabarti analog?, I’m very thinly aware of USA politicians.

        As far I know, Mexicans are somewhat low profile in USA politics and academic circles, exempting the border counties of the south.

        1. I don’t wanna say more than that as I don’t keep up with that person.

          And that’s all I wanna say unless more is necessary. For this place I’m illiterate and I don’t Razib and Zach throwing books at me.

          Sorry AnAn, I don’t wanna touch the PoMo stuff. That stuff only exists in the big cities here but it’s extending as the middle-class lefties imitate the Gringos.

    2. A BP reader from Mexico,

      Thanks for sharing. How would you compare and contrast Mexico with America? With India?

      How popular are the assumptions of post modernism in Mexico?

      1. To me, there’s a lot of things Mexico and USA have in common and in contrast.

        One thing that come to my mind is the social and economic context of the last years of the decade, there is a generational change in the political class and the labor market in both sides of the Rio Grande.

        Some young people want the social visibility and mobility of the upper classes (bussiness and political), and as Ray pointed out, they are usually of the middle and upper middle class.

        One strategy to try to get there is embracing social justice stuff, and nowadays the populism appeal in politics is gainning traction in the new generation.

        Thats why we see people like, AOC, Trump, AMLO (Acronym for Andres Manuel López Obrador, Mexico’s President), and so on, from every side of the political spectrum.

        Honestly, I dont have enough information about India, but I can assume they are facing a similar scenario, with their growing middle class and social changes. I’ve heard there’s a growing polarization between the two largest political parties. I think is part of this phenomenon.

        As to the post modernism ideas, the mexican society, I think, are getting more skeptical as to traditional ways, but still more conservative han not, on the whole.

        1. A BP reader from Mexico,

          Thanks.

          Very interesting. How much resentment is there for the upper middle class (educated at elite universities) among the Mexican middle class and lower middle class? In America there is a lot of resentment against college educated Americans by non college educated Americans.

          About 67% of Mexicans are now born out of wedlock. The divorce rate is about 30%. Both of these have increased sharply in recent years (unlike the US where the increase in out of wedlock births started earlier and has been slower; divorce rates in the US are at the lowest level in a generation). Why is this? Could it partly be because of post modernism? Might this be contributing to why Mexico is stuck in the upper middle income country trap (slow growth)?

          Would love to learn more about Mexican deep culture (there are several layers to culture). For example the influence of Catholicism (and difference branches within Catholicism), Evangelicals, other faiths? The influence of atheism, post modernism (which tends to be anti-theist in many ways and pro-theist in many other ways), secularism (whatever that means), science, entertainment industry, social media, etc.

          Would love to hear more about your perspectives regarding universalism, Yoga, meditation, spirituality and many other things.

          1. Certainly there are some resentment, but it seems is more focused in the socioeconomic status than in the academic grades.

            Without doubt the traditional Catholic church is loosing influence in favor of evangelical movements (in fact, some of them appear to act as the “moral” arm of the current president, ironic as it is, because the likes to champion the laicism cause).

            The children born out of wedlock are about half your number, the divorce rate is as you said. I dont know whats behind this trend, but poverty and lack of education are still a big reason in the case of teen pregnancies.

            Alternative religious approaches to the traditional christian options are still marginal today, as far I can see.

          2. Out of wedlock birth rate in Mexico soared in the last few years to 67%:
            https://www.oecd.org/els/family/SF_2_4_Share_births_outside_marriage.pdf

            “some resentment, but it seems is more focused in the socioeconomic status than in the academic grades.:

            Fascinating.

            “Without doubt the traditional Catholic church is loosing influence in favor of evangelical movements (in fact, some of them appear to act as the “moral” arm of the current president, ironic as it is, because the likes to champion the laicism cause).”

            This appears a common view. Very interesting.

            “I dont know whats behind this trend, but poverty and lack of education are still a big reason in the case of teen pregnancies.”

            Hmm. Both America and Mexico had very low rates of out of wedlock births and divorce in the 1930s during the great depression. Both America and Mexico were far poorer in the 1930s. What else could be contributing to divorce and out of wedlock births?

            “Alternative religious approaches to the traditional christian options are still marginal today, as far I can see.”

            Hmm. Including meditation, conciousness, Yoga, Tai Chi/Qi Gong/Accupuncture?

            Do you consider english reporting on Mexico to be misleading and inaccurate?

            Thanks again for sharing so many useful details.

          3. I think some of the reasons out of wedlock children are more common are
            a) it’s actually being measured much better by INEGI (Mexican office of statistics)
            b) that Mexicans, despite the Catholicism, are kinda libertarian and they hustle with their morals.

            I’m not a good Catholic myself and the “Catholic Nation” descriptor is not accurate. Poland does a better job at it.

            AnAn, I think this talk by Jorge Castañeda (at the Hudson Institute!) will be more helpful for some commentary on Mexico: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X80vJFrnE5A

    3. I find very paradojic and funny the fact that the wealthiest younger (and not so young) generation who born in golden cradles full of pretty stuff worthy of social media signaling, are the new proletarians trying to begin the radical wealth distribution of the era.
      Funny, but not unusual. Socialist/Communist leadership has always came from well-off middle classes (the classic petty bourgeoisie). Lenin’s father was a senior educationist who rose on to become part of Czarist nobility (top 1% of Russian empire’s population). Fidel Castro was the son of a wealthy landholder. Proletariat simply do not have spare time on their hands to bring about revolution, with them always being busy trying to feed themselves.

  4. After their families “escaped” socialism in the subcontinent, their kids wants socialism in the US. LOL

    In a cyncial way i want these progressive democrats to succeed, its only when they are in power and make everything free they will know someone has to pay up, and that certain someone will not be happy.

    In India last election something similar happened, where the Congress tried to introduce a semi Universal basic income. The funny part was the people (the poor) who were entitled for that scheme didnt know/ believe what they would get, while the rich who would be paying up knew exactly about the scheme.

  5. My view is that South Asian Americans are simply over-achieving due to being descended from a highly-selected group of over-achievers from the sub-continent.

    no shit. i don’t know what the point of this is supposed to be. poor, uneducated people should also be able to do awesome?

    This allows them to be successful in-spite of the cultural marginalization or affirmative action challenges that they face in America.

    affirmative action is marginal. most people don’t go to selective universities, even among asian americans. the regression of income in father-son pairs in the USA is what you’d expect.

    discrimination exists. but it’s not a massive problem.

    and what are you going to do about it? affirmative action for a community which on the whole is doing quite well? you sound like a whiner.

    1. The point is that over-achievement of model minority brownz doesn’t prove that racial bias or cultural marginalization don’t exist.

      Ultimately I would want people to be treated fairly as individuals, regardless of race, gender, sexuality etc.

      I do think racial bias is a widespread social problem in America.

      I am against the top-down, bureaucratic approach as that progressive democrats advocate, since the laws are fairly race neutral.

      But an honest dialogue that acknowledges these issues is necessary. And it can be effective.

      For eg. The brown representation in American TV and movies has improved tremendously in the 2010s as a result of dialogue on these issues or ‘whining’ if you prefer.

      Maybe in the grand scheme of things these minor injustices aren’t a big deal. But the conservative republican approach is too dismissive for my liking.

      1. “The point is that over-achievement of model minority brownz doesn’t prove that racial bias or cultural marginalization don’t exist.”

        Sumit, have you lived long in the US? Americans think we are far more powerful and successful (dominant even) than you are implying. Americans treat us like brownz Jews. Americans have the right to treat us however they want.

        “Model Minority” is a cliche from the 1960s. It no longer explains America. America has growing numbers of market dominant ethnics and minorities. [Koreans, Chinese, Persians, Lebanese, Azerbaijanis, Nigerians, Jamaicans, Cubans and many others]

        You are 100% right that there is widespread discrimination and jealousy against us (and Jews for that matter). Our success (and Jewish success) is despite enormous bigotry, jealousy and obstacles. Some might argue that our success (and the success of our Jewish sisters) is because of said bigotry and jealousy.

        I have tried to explain this to many caucasian friends. The truth is that few believe me any more. They ask “prove it”. One asked me this today. The message of many caucasians appears to be . . . you are among the most privileged people in the world and need to own it. {Which I disagree with.} Many caucasians say that we have powerful extended families and social circles and culture that cause our socio-economic success. They think we benefit from stereotypes about Asians being very smart. Caucasians (excluding some ethnics such as Jews) don’t have this privilege.

        What would you say to this?

        “I do think racial bias is a widespread social problem in America.”

        Completely agree. It is strongest against Jews. But it is also growing towards us (are Americans are jealous of our success?) We (Jews and Deshis) can’t talk about this in polite company. If we do, caucasians might accuse us of “white supremacy”, “racism”, nazism”, “exploitation”, “oppression” and the like.

        “”Ultimately I would want people to be treated fairly as individuals, regardless of race, gender, sexuality etc.””

        This is called “color blind.” While most black Americans believe this and support this. It is dangerous for us (Jews and Asians) to say this.

        Colemen Hughes (patriotic black american student) recently posted a long written statement . . . and was attacked by many caucasians for the usual (racism, white supremacy etc.) Then Coleman revealed that the long written statement was authored by MLK. Many of MLK’s speeches from the 1960s would now be considered hate speech and racist.

        “laws are fairly race neutral.”

        Is this your reading of the 1964 Civil Rights Act 1965 Voting Rights Act? Please study “Protected Class”:
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protected_group
        These were emergency limitations placed on freedom of art and speech (including freedom to conduct business) to solve a civil rights emergency. {Which did exist in 1964.}

        In my opinion all protected classes should be banned ASAP other than for multi-generational black Americans. We should also legislate that multi-generational black Americans will no longer be a protected class 50 years from now.

        “But an honest dialogue that acknowledges these issues is necessary. And it can be effective.”

        Do you think America is mature enough to have a dialogue like this right now? I am skeptical. Look at the way caucasians attack Glenn Loury, John McWhorter, Kmele Foster, Coleman Hughes, Ian Rowe, Michael Fortner, Roland Fryer, Thomas Sowell for being racist and white supremacist. All of them are left liberals other than Thomas Sowell. Roland Fryer recently got fired from Harvard.

        Please watch:
        https://www.manhattan-institute.org/html/barriers-black-progress-structural-cultural-or-both-11751.html

        Former President Obama is speaking out publicly in a very courageous way on this subject. But Sumit, if you or I or one of our Jewish friends tried to speak similarly . . . my oh my.

        “For eg. The brown representation in American TV and movies has improved tremendously in the 2010s as a result of dialogue on these issues or ‘whining’ if you prefer.”

        We are now over represented. Has this hurt us further? This makes us even bigger exploiters, oppressors and haters in the minds of many caucasians.

        “Maybe in the grand scheme of things these minor injustices aren’t a big deal.”

        1000% right. We should follow the example of the Dalai Lama . . . one of our greatest heroes and leaders. The Dalai Lama said that many consider Buddhists to be terrorists. And he smiled/laughed very beautifully. The Dalai Lama said that many consider the Dalai Lama to be a terrorist. And again he smiled very sweetly. It is okay.

        “But the conservative republican approach is too dismissive for my liking.”

        Do you think we should reach out to friends and allies from across all parts of American society?:
        —very conservative
        —conservative
        —moderate
        —liberal
        —very liberal
        —left
        —every special interest group, minority and ethnic group

        We need to stop accepting the frames, assumptions, paradigms and memoplexes of others. We don’t have to choose between them. We can be best friends forever with all of them.

    2. I think Indian-Americans are doing well in progressive circles these days because they’re brown enough and colonized enough to plausibly claim minority status while not actually having many of the problems that other claimants to minority status typically have.

  6. “Today the man behind the skirt is <<>>, a Communistic fellow of bhadralok, Wall Street, and Silicon Valley pedigree who is driving the Democratic party to the Left ”

    To be frank , growing up, i never met a bengali who wasn’t left or centre of left. Always found that odd .

    Till i discovered twitter and then i found bengali folks who felt the BJP wasn’t right wing enough. LOL

    1. It’s fun. You get to read the NYT and WaPo hacks who think the BJP is Hitler 2.0, then you get to read Twitter Bhakts who think the BJP is basically Congress with a different letterhead.
      The Twitter Bhakts are closer to the truth I think.

    2. Saurav:

      “To be frank , growing up, i never met a bengali who wasn’t left or centre of left. Always found that odd.”

      Very true. But I never found that odd. It has been that way since the 1940s. More recently Bengalis are starting to normalize. West Bengal is one of the largest economic miracles in the world. {Couldn’t have said this five years ago.}

      Bengal and Bengalis now rock!

  7. On the other side don’t forget pols Bobby Jindal and Nikki Haley and pundits* Reihan Salam and Ramesh Ponnuru.

    I am supporting Nikki Haley for President in 2024.

    *irony not intended.

    1. Walter Sobchak, you could name over a hundred others on the Republican side. I am a Nikki Haley fan!

      Is it best to have lots of people in every state and across every part of the political spectrum? Many Deshis seem to think so.

  8. But is that because South Asians are *inherently less capable* of creating advanced societies as the Sailer brigade would have us believe, or is it because South Asians have greater barriers to overcome than East Asians (direct colonization, caste issues, democracy vs, authoritarianism, etc.)?

    two points

    1 – the regression to the mean in father-son pairs for indian americans doesn’t suggest anything you would be surprised by. so the stretched criticisms of some sailer-fellow travelers about the children of educated brownz 20 years ago don’t hold up (they are presenting similar parental capital as their parents, albeit regression back somewhat).

    2 – japan and korea had very high human capital levels centuries ago. here we’re talking about stuff like widespread literacy and emphasis on broad-based schooling. indians i’ve talked to say that india had the same with temples and madrassas but british destroyed it. seems like a conspiracy to me. you argue and litigate whether it’s biological/cultural etc., but a lot of the basis raw material for growth were there and supressed by communism (china is bigger and more diverse, so i’m going to leave it out of this generality).

    15 years ago i said vietnam would surpass bangladesh in GDP per capita just based on literacy rate (vietnam was poor than even bangladesh in the 1990s!). that happened.

    1. If by literacy you mean its usual referent ‘reading from and writing with a script’, sir, then perhaps most of India (Hindus; I don’t know much about Muslims) might not have had a widespread literacy before the British. (But south India when compared to north India seems to have historically had a greater importance attached to writing.) Hindus of the upper castes (Brahmins, traders) and several middle castes up to (even poorer) peasants (in regions where they are socially dominant like in south India) might have had some kind of oral culture by-hearting classical literary texts (or may be just portions of them) and singing them in daily life, but I don’t know if that counts. The then SC and ST (and also probably some OBC) background peoples may also have had oral cultures like transmitting folk ballads, etc. not intimately connected with the classical literary traditions. But in any case, broad-based education of any nature – I doubt many had except upper castes (and maybe also richer people of all/most castes). Occupation-related knowledge tended to pass down families probably depending on people’s castes and any other relevant factors.

      I think all this on the basis of two things, sir: the first is the testimony of C P Brown that even commoner Telugu people tended to know Telugu Bhagavatam by heart (maybe not fully but just portions of it) and the other is the fact that Molla, a woman who was the daughter of a potter (potters along with weavers and some others from the constellation of what are called left-hand artisan castes were somewhat culturally elite and they apparently had some kind of rivalry with the Brahmins related to cultural matters; they are also widely represented among the people adhering to the Virashaiva religion that started out as anti-Vedic (at least anti-caste)) ended up composing a Telugu translation of Ramayana somewhere in 1500-1600 AD period perhaps (not fully sure about the time period).

      1. Santosh, when was Veerashaiva ever anti Vedic?

        Are you referring to the tradition of Sri Siddhantha Shikamani? I have not read it but would love to:
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siddhanta_Shikhamani
        I regard it as one of the greatest poems to Shiva . . . and one of the greatest ancient traditions of Veda Agama. Agastya is intimately connected with Sri Siddhanta Shikamani. I love me some Agastya rishi!

        Are you referring to a different tradition?

        1. I don’t know if you are right, AnAn, but the comment I wrote is so extraordinarily horrible even for my standards (I have no damn idea why I keep commenting on Brown Pundits even when completely unnecessary). I wish there was a way to cancel all of that comment but as part of my immediate responsibility to minimise damage, I will say that all my frothing at the mouth regarding the Virashaiva religion and the artisan castes and stuff was poorly researched and completely unverified by me and very likely to be wrong.

  9. Here is the oficial statics institute for Demography in Mexico; http://www.inegi.org.mx. There’s an english version, not so good but still readable.

    I dont know the references and numbers from that OECD study. Still, I find it very useful, maybe an outsider impartial source could be more accurate. It’s worthy of reading.

    1. “Thats why we see people like, AOC, Trump, AMLO (Acronym for Andres Manuel López Obrador, Mexico’s President), and so on, from every side of the political spectrum.”

      Just one last thing hasn;t anyone in Mexico suggested re arranging AMLO;s acronym to LMAO 😛

    2. “Thats why we see people like, AOC, Trump, AMLO (Acronym for Andres Manuel López Obrador, Mexico’s President), and so on, from every side of the political spectrum.”

      Just one last thing hasn;t anyone in Mexico suggested re arranging AMLO;s acronym to LMAO 😛

  10. Regarding the left wing brown Americans, would it be fair to say that there is a history of being on the left, or supporting socialism among the South Asian diaspora?

    The founder of Jacobin magazine is a brown New Yorker of Trinidadian roots, the leader of the Canada left-wing NDP party is Sikh, and you also have a history of labor organization among the working class brown diaspora in places like South Africa, Guyana etc.

    But brown Americans are much more white collar than many of these (past and present) brown diasporas and many continue to favor the left, despite being economically well off.

    Perhaps it’s like the Jewish diaspora’s history with the left in the US (eg. garment workers in NYC) and being Democratic today. Indeed I think there’s a good parallel with American browns and Jewish Americans here.

  11. ” However, Korean immigration to the United States remains fairly high compared to, say, Japanese immigration”

    Not the case. Korean immigration has already peaked, it was indeed high in the later 20th century to the early 2000s but peaked in 2010. The number of Korean immigrants has actually *decreased* this decade.

    See this source:

    https://www.migrationpolicy.org/article/korean-immigrants-united-states

    “As of 2017, the Korean immigrant population had decreased by about 37,000 since 2010”.

    There’s still a lot of Korean first-generation immigrants which might make people perceive that the rate is still high but it’s down now that Korea is rich and developed.

    East Asian immigration is already pretty stagnant in growth. Japan no longer sends many immigrants as has been the case for a while, and more recently rich places like Korea and Taiwan have even become net receivers of immigrants rather than senders (just like say, countries like Greece and Italy are, despite being long-time emigration countries). Chinese immigration is still somewhat high but I think also near peaked (if not already).

    South Asian immigration however, still has potential for growth, even if “return migration” trends have already started for India.

    American society’s perception just still lags, so Asian Americans are still seen as more recent immigrants despite a not unreasonable sizeable native born population.

  12. Ray from Mexico:
    “AnAn, I think this talk by Jorge Castañeda (at the Hudson Institute!) will be more helpful for some commentary on Mexico: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X80vJFrnE5A

    I love content like this and love Jorge. Can you please suggest other high quality content of this type. I am watching Jorge’s analysis now.

    Are you familiar with Graham Hancock and his most recent book which provides circumstantial evidence consistent with Brazil and Mexico having advanced civilizations pre 1500 AD?

    1. AnAn, as I’ve told you I’m not smart enough for this place so never heard of the guy.

      If you like Castañeda look for a guy named Macario Schettino. He doesn’t have youtube content in English buy might have written a few papers of interest. He even follows Razib!

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