Indian Idol, Super Singer Star Maalavika Sundar on Learning Carnatic Music in a Traditional Gurukul

On the 23rd Episode of The Indic Explorer Show-my weekly podcast, I spoke to Maalavika Sundar one of the top contestants in Super Singer as well as The Indian Idol. We spoke about the how the training and practice of Carnatic Music is carried out within a Traditional Indian Gurukul.

The Indic Explorer YouTube channel focusses on the interplay of Indic culture with modernity explored through different facets in the socio-cultural sphere.

Do subscribe to the channel at https://www.youtube.com/theindicexplorer

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Substack-https://digitaldharma.substack.com/

History of Travel in Ancient India and the State of Heritage Tourism in Modern India

On the 22nd Episode of The Indic Explorer Show-my weekly podcast, I spoke to Anuradha Goyal on the History of Travel in Ancient India and the State of Heritage Tourism in India today.

The Indic Explorer YouTube channel focusses on the interplay of Indic culture with modernity explored through different facets in the socio-cultural sphere.

Do subscribe to the channel at https://www.youtube.com/theindicexplorer

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Episode 17: Mughals-the socio-cultural milieu and their Decline

 

Another Browncast is up. You can listen on LibsynAppleSpotify, and Stitcher (and a variety of other platforms). Probably the easiest way to keep up the podcast since we don’t have a regular schedule is to subscribe to one of the links above!

Episode 17 of the series of Podcasts on the history of Indian sub-continent.

Maneesh speaks to Jay and Omar on the socio-cultural milieu of the Mughals and their decline.

Across the two episodes on Mughals we haven’t talked about the Sikhs and the Rajpoots. We plan to do dedicated episodes on them.

A notable miss across both the episodes is Kabir Das. Perhaps an episode on the great spiritual figures of the millennium some day !

 

Sources and References:

1. Advanced Study in the History of Medieval India : Volume II by J.L Mehta
2. The History and Culture of the Indian People: Volume 7. The Mughul Empire
3. Akbar and His India by Irfan Habib
4. Culture of Encounters: Sanskrit at the Mughal Court by Audrey Truschke
5. The life of a text: performing the Rāmcaritmānas of Tulsidas by Philip Lutgendorf
6. Three Bhakti Voices Mirabai, Surdas, and Kabir in their Time and Ours by John Stratton Hawley
7. The Mughals and the Sufis by Muzaffar Alam
8. Did Aurangzeb Ban Music? Questions for the Historiography of His Reign
by Katherine Butler Brown [ARTICLE]
9. The Early Sūr Sāgar and the Growth of the Sūr Tradition
by John Stratton Hawley [ARTICLE]
10. Hidden in Plain View: Brajbhasha Poets at the Mughal Court
by Allison Busch [ARTICLE]
11. The Meeting of Musical Cultures in the 16th-century Court of the Mughal Akbar by Bonnie C. Wade [ARTICLE]

 

 

Journey Till Now – Who and What is The Indic Explorer?

On the 21st Episode of The Indic Explorer Show, my weekly podcast I do a monologue talking about my journey before YouTube, the manner in which I went about starting this channel and how has the story been so far since inception in the last 6 months.

I also take some of the audience questions and talk about future plans and show formats that I intend to experiment with over the coming year.

The Indic Explorer YouTube channel focusses on the interplay of Indic culture with modernity explored through different facets in the socio-cultural sphere.

Do subscribe to the channel at https://www.youtube.com/theindicexplorer

and follow me here

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Substack-https://digitaldharma.substack.com/

Best of The Indic Explorer Show – 2022 Rewind

On this End of the Year Special Episode of my weekly Podcast- The Indic Explorer Show on YouTube, you can get to see the best highlight reel moments of the show. It has been just 6 months since I started this channel and we have grown from strength to strength, clocking 1k subscribers this month.

Looking forward for your continued support.

The Indic Explorer YouTube channel focusses on the interplay of Indic culture with modernity explored through different facets in the socio-cultural sphere.

Do subscribe to the channel at https://www.youtube.com/theindicexplorer

and follow me here

Twitter- https://twitter.com/theindicexplor1

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Substack-https://digitaldharma.substack.com/

 

Sree Iyer on the Cultural Outlook of the Indian Diaspora

Sree Iyer of the Pgurus YouTube Channel came on the 20th Episode of The Indic Explorer Show, my weekly podcast to talk about The Cultural Outlook of the Indian Diaspora.

The Indic Explorer YouTube channel focusses on the interplay of Indic culture with modernity explored through different facets in the socio-cultural sphere.

Do subscribe to the channel at https://www.youtube.com/theindicexplorer

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Substack-https://digitaldharma.substack.com/

A Dialogue with Dr. Michael Altman, author of “Hinduism in America: An Introduction”

I just published an interview with Dr. Altman over on the Hindoo History substack. Posting an excerpt here but would encourage BP readers to read the whole thing. He’s also the author of “Heathen, Hindoo, Hindu: American Representations of India, 1721-1893”, a key contribution to the study of how the “Hindoo” has been represented in American history:



HH: Dr. Altman, first of all, thank you so much for doing this. As readers of #HindooHistory know, your work has been instrumental to this project. I really didn’t know what to do with all of these random newspaper clips that I was collecting until I fortuitously came across your first book, Heathen, Hindoo, Hindu: American Representations of India, 1721-1893. Your book gave me the intellectual scaffolding for the primary source material, so thank you for that! You can imagine how excited I was when I saw that you had written another book, Hinduism in America: An Introduction, which is the subject of our dialogue today.

To kick it off, in your introduction you note that you were hesitant to title the book Hinduism in America: An Introduction and would’ve preferred to call it Some Things Someone Somewhere Called ‘Hinduism’ in a Place Someone Somewhere Called America: An Introduction. I loved this, and I was reminded of your introduction to Heathen, Hindoo, Hindu, where you make a critical distinction: This is not about how “Hinduism” arrived in America, but rather about how it became conceivable in America. Can you elaborate on this methodological approach and explain how it informs your argument in Hinduism in America?

MA: Thanks so much, Vishal. I’m really glad you found my first book so helpful. You write these things and you never know who is going to read them or what they will do with it once they read it. Your work sharing the newspaper clippings you find is really important, and I really appreciate it. I’ve actually heard from other religious studies professors that they use your Instagram and my book together in their classes! So, thanks for the work you’ve done to bring public attention to this really interesting history.

The second book, Hinduism in America: An Introduction, was a really interesting opportunity to write a different kind of religious history. The book is part of a larger series of “ in America” introductions and I wanted to write a book that could fit in that model but also raise some questions about the very idea of discrete unified traditions or religions (Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Buddhism, etc. ) in America (or anywhere else for that matter). For me, the job of the religious studies scholar is not primarily to identify, describe, or define these traditions. Instead, our job is to pay attention to how individuals, communities, groups, institutions, nations, and other social formations define and identify these traditions. Put another way, many people who all call themselves “Hindu” or “Christian” or “Muslim” don’t all agree on exactly what it means to be “Hindu” or “Christian” or “Muslim,” and it’s not my job to solve that. It’s my job to pay attention to how and why people use those terms to describe themselves or others and what is at stake in those processes of labeling people and groups. As I tell my students, we are not umpires and we don’t call balls and strikes. We are play-by-play analysts who describe how the game is being played and analyze why it’s being played the way it is. My approach to the study of religion is that religion is one way people create “us and them” and my job is to figure out how and why that happens.

So for this book, rather than telling readers “this is what Hinduism is” and then “here’s where you can find it in America,” I wanted to walk through the ways the categories “Hindu” and “Hinduism” have been used by a variety of people, groups, communities, and institutions in America. I also wanted to introduce readers to some basic analytical terms in religious studies (difference, Orientalism, diaspora, etc.). So, each chapter looks at a set of examples of how and why people in America described or defined or identified “Hindus” or “Hinduism” and then uses those examples to illustrate one of these analytical terms. The chapters are loosely in chronological order but it’s not a single historical narrative. Rather, it’s a variety of examples of how somebody somewhere called something “Hindu.”

Ratan Sharda on State of Cultural Deracination & Cultural Literacy in Dharmic Youth

Ratan Sharda comes on The Indic Explorer Show, my weekly podcast to talk about ‘The Causes of Cultural Deracination’ and ‘How to Improve Cultural Literacy Among Dharmic Youth.’

The Indic Explorer YouTube channel focusses on the interplay of Indic culture with modernity explored through different facets in the socio-cultural sphere.

Do subscribe to the channel at https://www.youtube.com/theindicexplorer

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Substack-https://digitaldharma.substack.com/

Are Indian Intellectuals Anti India – Salvatore Babones

Salvatore Babones a comparative sociologist chats with me on The Indic Explorer Channel on whether Indian intellectuals are against India and are largely to be blamed for the country’s poor standing Internationally and especially in the Western World.

You should also check out the concluding section of this discussion here (https://youtu.be/5HmGeHSkFdQ), after watching the above video.

The Indic Explorer YouTube channel focusses on the interplay of Indic culture with modernity explored through different facets in the socio-cultural sphere.

Do subscribe to the channel at https://www.youtube.com/theindicexplorer

and follow me here

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Substack-https://digitaldharma.substack.com/

Roshan Cariappa on Job Crisis in Big Tech & Startups

Roshan Cariappa chats with me on my podcast this week on ‘The Job Crisis in Big Tech Companies & Startups’.

The Indic Explorer YouTube channel focusses on the interplay of Indic culture with modernity explored through different facets in the socio-cultural sphere.

Do subscribe to the channel at https://www.youtube.com/theindicexplorer

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Substack-https://digitaldharma.substack.com/

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